Shampoos for curly hair  
There can be no denying that long, curly hair looks striking. But what can probably be stated with equal confidence is that it is also very difficult to maintain.
If you possess hair that is curled and falls to you shoulders, there is every likelihood that you have tried out various hair products. You only have to walk into your local supermarket to look at all the beauty care shelves, containing seemingly endless possibilities, from the inexpensive to the downright extortionate.
If you possess hair that is curled and falls to you shoulders, there is every likelihood that you have tried out various hair products. You only have to walk into your local supermarket to look at all the beauty care shelves, containing seemingly endless possibilities, fromaFor all that you may well have chopped and changed between different options, the chances are that what you are looking for is something that will answer the ultimate question: will this purchase be the hair care solution I am looking for. Unfortunately, the most likely answer to this question is, in fact, no. The reason for this is fairly straightforward: there are no conditioning or cleansing ingredients that have unique properties for curly hair. the inexpensive to the downright extortionate.
The fact is, no-one washing with a shampoo exclusively labeled ‘for long curly hair' has ever achieved any better results than if they were using products which did not carry this targeted statement.
So when we are looking into the ideal hair treatments for curly hair, what should we be considering? Firstly, this type of here is usually much drier and therefore more prone to damage than any other hair type. This is particularly the case if the curly hair has also been dyed. The initial step that you must take is to employ a shampoo and conditioner that is designed for dry or damaged hair. This should be the overriding factor for your consideration, not whether or not there is any mention of curly hair on the label. Believe it or not, those shampoos labeled ‘for damaged hair' and ‘for curly hair' will more than likely share strikingly similar chemical characteristics.
Another Thing to be wary of, are those shampoos and conditioners which appear to be far more expensive than those nestling beside them on the shelves. There is actually very little difference in the combinations of formulas used right across the board. The variations in the price ranges tend to be down to marketing gimmickry rather than hard scientific facts! This is the case whether we are referring to products you see in department stores, sold under their own brand, and those available in more upmarket salons. All the bottom line is, when it comes to caring for a long curly hair, the old consumer adage that ‘you get what you pay for' is simply a myth.
Assuming you have settled on a shampoo that is aimed at dry hair, then the next question to ask yourself is how often should I be washing my curly hair? No matter what consistency your hair happens to be, you do not want to be shampooing it too frequently. This activity damages hair, no matter what the chemical formula of the particular shampoo might advertise itself as. Too much shampoo often keeps dry air dry, a situation that is exacerbated when towel drying and brushing is added to the punishment meted out on your hair! Less is undoubtedly best.